Jennifer Tomasik, Carey Gallagher, Lynn Oppenheim
This is the second piece in a series of articles about creating a “Culture of Value” in your organization. view »
Jennifer Tomasik, Carey Gallagher
This is the first in a series on Creating a Culture of Value view »
Carey Gallagher and Jennifer Tomasik

This is the fourth in a series of four articles published in the Wharton Healthcare Quarterly about actionable practices for effective inter professional collaboration.

 view »
Carey Gallagher and Jennifer Tomasik

This is the second in a series of four articles published in the Wharton Healthcare Quarterly about actionable practices for effective inter professional collaboration.

 view »
Carey Gallagher and Jennifer Tomasik

This is the third in a series of four articles published in the Wharton Healthcare Quarterly about actionable practices for effective inter professional collaboration. 

 view »
Jennifer Tomasik and Carey Gallagher
This is the fourth in a series of four articles, published in the Wharton Healthcare Quarterly, exploring opportunities to improve collaboration in healthcare settings. We describe practical tools to enhance institutional performance through better collaboration — toward the primary goal of providing better patient care. view »
Jennifer Tomasik and Carey Gallagher
This is the third in a series of four articles, published in the Wharton Healthcare Quarterly, exploring opportunities to improve collaboration in healthcare settings, in this case between physicians and healthcare administrators. We describe practical tools to enhance institutional performance through better collaboration — toward the primary goal of providing better patient care. view »
Jennifer Tomasik and Carey Gallagher
This is the second in a series of four articles, published in the Wharton Healthcare Quarterly, exploring opportunities to improve collaboration in healthcare settings. view »
Jennifer Tomasik and Carey Gallagher
This is the first in a series of four articles, published in the Wharton Healthcare Quarterly, exploring opportunities to improve collaboration in healthcare settings - between institutions, between physicians and administrators, and within inter-professional teams.  view »
Jennifer Tomasik and Carey Gallagher
This is the first in a series of three articles published in the Wharton Healthcare Quarterly about engaging patients in population health management. view »
Jennifer Tomasik and Carey Gallagher
This is the third in a series of three articles published in the Wharton Healthcare Quarterly about engaging patients in population health management. view »
Jennifer Tomasik and Carey Gallagher
This is the second in a series of three articles published in the Wharton Healthcare Quarterly about engaging patients in population health management. view »
Carey Gallagher and Jennifer Tomasik
This is the first in a series of four articles published in the Wharton Healthcare Quarterly about actionable practices for effective inter professional collaboration.  view »
Jennifer Tomasik and Carey Gallagher
This is the fourth in a series of four articles published in the Wharton Healthcare Quarterly about working towards being a “superconducting organization." view »
Jennifer Tomasik and Carey Gallagher
This is the second in a series of four articles published in the Wharton Healthcare Quarterly about working towards being a “superconducting organization." view »
Jennifer Tomasik and Carey Gallagher
This is the first in a series of four articles published in the Wharton Healthcare Quarterly about working towards being a “superconducting organization." view »
Jennifer Tomasik and Carey Gallagher
This is the third in a series of four articles published in the Wharton Healthcare Quarterly about working towards being a “superconducting organization view »
Jennifer Tomasik, Mario Moussa

Most people think of a traditional health care negotiation as doctors versus the HMO -- two opposite parties, providers and payer, battling it out over costs, coverage and reimbursement rates. But in reality the landscape is much more complex, with multiple discussions between multiple stakeholders taking place simultaneously. In a climate of rapidly escalating costs and political tensions, the stakes are growing ever higher for those at the negotiating table and perhaps even more so for those not physically present.

 

Published by Managed Healthcare Executive, July 1, 2004 as a web exclusive.

 

Jennifer Tomasik

Physicians are being asked to take on more formal leadership positions in healthcare organizations. As chief medical officers, chief quality officers and department chiefs and other senior positions, physicians face a complex array of challenges, including cost constraints, improving operational performance across silos, and the pressure to improve quality while reducing medical error. These challenges require more than an individual leader’s time and attention-they demand a team-based approach that brings together the best of clinical and managerial expertise.

 

Published in Healthcare Executive, May/June 2008, pp. 82 – 83.

 view »
Jennifer Tomasik, Mario Moussa

Chapter 15 in The Business of Medical Practice: Transformational Health 2.0 Skills for Doctors. New York: David E. Marcinko and Hope R Hetico. Springer Pub. Co., 2011

Jennifer Tomasik

Chapter 8 in  Hospitals & Healthcare Organizations: Management Strategies, Operational Techniques, Tools, Templates and Case Studies. David E. Marcinko and Hope R. Hetico. Productivity Press, 2012.

Jennifer Tomasik, Thomas Gilmore, Andrew Schafer

Strategic planning is sweeping academic medicine. Across the country, faculty and administrators at all levels have been drawn into planning processes as sponsors or assigned to task forces or other leadership roles, often with considerable ambivalence. They wonder: "Is this a meaningful process? Will real work get done? Will it actually have an effect on the future of the school, hospital, division, etc.? Can we plan effectively amid so much change?'

 

American Journal of Medicine, vol. 118 no. 3, March 2005, pp. 315 – 320

Jennifer Tomasik, Mario Moussa

A Return to the Fundamentals

Chronic and preventable conditions, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes, account for the vast majority of health care costs. While population health programs have demonstrated their financial and clinical effectiveness in the treatment of these behavior-related conditions, the reimbursement system encourages hospitals and physicians to focus instead on the acute-care crises of individual patients. This perverse situation will last until policy makers overcome a profound cultural bias that shapes the current debate over health care expenditures, focusing attention on individual, rather than population health. We propose an agenda for cultural change that promotes five alternative ways of framing the debate: populations vs. patients, preventive vs. reactive care, chronic conditions vs. acute conditions, integrated health care teams vs. physicians, and communities vs. individuals.

Learning Objectives
1. To discuss the financial implications of leaving population health needs unaddressed.
2. To gain insight into the perverse incentives brought about by transaction-based financing which drive up the cost of health care.
3. To identify viable alternatives to the current acute-care health care delivery system

 

 

Chapter 8 in Nash, David B., et al. Population Health: Creating a Culture of Wellness. Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Learning, 2011
 

Jennifer Tomasik, Carey Gallagher, Fabian Poliak

Chapter 8 in Financial Management Strategies for Hospitals and Healthcare Organizations: Tools, Techniques, Checklists and Case Studies. David E. Marcinko and Hope R. Hetico, CPC Press, 2014.

Jennifer Tomasik
A Webinar conducted for the New England Society for Healthcare Communications (NESHCO) on March 29, 2012 view »
Jennifer Tomasik, Thomas Gilmore, Andrew Schafer
This is a draft table that looks at some of the typical problems and countermeasures in strategic planning. The final article can be found in The American Journal of Medicine, Vol 118, No 3, March 2005, pp 315-320. view »
Jennifer Tomasik
Published in Healthcare Executive, Volume 19, Number 6, Nov/Dec 2004, p. 29. (Professional Pointers column). view »
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